ABOUT

MANAGER CLIMATE CORPS (MCC)

“Information, in itself, is not knowledge, nor do we become any more knowledgeable through its accumulation. Our knowledgeability consists, rather, in the capacity to situate such information, and understand its meaning within the context of direct perceptual engagements with our environments.” Ingold, 2011

OUR FOCUS

Mission

The PI-CASC mission delivers science that helps fish, wildlife, water, land, and people adapt to a changing climate. The Manager Climate Corps (MCC) program is a practitioner-driven graduate research program that accomplishes this mission through the process of knowledge co-production. Through this collaborative process we work to increasingly “get to know our neighbors” and unite natural and cultural resource managers with researchers in every stage of the research pathway, from the development of the research question, to the methods and analysis, and ultimate utilization of research output. Hosted by the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, the MCC builds adaptive capacity locally by identifying existing professional networks and expanding them through manager-driven research projects and collaborative forums.

For more details of the MCC program and process, please check out our MCC Approach page, 2020 US Climate Resilience Toolkit Case Study, 2018 publication in Environmental Management, and poster.

FOUNDATIONAL ELEMENTS

Supporting and developing long-term trust

Building upon existing in-person professional networks (knowledge networks)

Utilizing knowledge co-production (manager-driven collaborative research)

Recognizing and engaging multiple knowledge forms

Goal & Objectives

Our goal is to support long-term, in-person relationships and collaborative research projects by uniting local research and management networks through the process of knowledge co-production.

OBJECTIVES

  1. Identify and engage existing local natural and cultural resource manager networks on Hawaiʻi Island.
  2. Support and expand these local knowledge networks by directly and iteratively connecting scientists and stakeholders.
  3. Engage networks through collaborative networking opportunities and stakeholder-driven research projects that offer immediately useful products to local natural resource managers and communities through the process of knowledge co-production.
Bethany Morrison explores the coasts of Kaʻū
Bethany Morrison (Planning Department, County of Hawaiʻi) explores the coasts of Kaʻū as she participates in a immersion forum supporting practitioner-driven research pathways
Climate Change Boot Camp
Climate Change Immersion Camp at the Kiolakaʻa Ranger Station in Kaʻū on August 9th - 12th 2016

DEFINING KNOWLEDGE CO-PRODUCTION

As knowledge co-production becomes increasingly familiar, definitions are helpful to determine what it is and what it is not. MCC offers these definitions to the scientific dialogue: 

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Knowledge Co-production is the iterative and collaborative process to produce usable scientific solutions. This process directly involves the management and policy decision-makers, while integrating diverse expertise, knowledge forms, and roles to generate place-based and sustainable science.

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The Knowledge Network is a collective of scientists and stakeholders working together through the knowledge co-production process with the shared goal of producing usable scientific products. Stakeholder examples include natural resource managers, cultural practitioners, community leaders and policy professionals.

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Multiple knowledge forms refers to the sum total of ways of knowing within the human condition. Such knowledge forms include but are not limited to logical knowledge (articulate knowledge) that result from rational intellect, technical analysis, and reason, as well as intrinsic knowledge (tacit knowledge) that result from experience, instinct, perception, cultural practice, intuition, unconscious, and emotion.

OUR PROGRAMMATIC PROCESS

Turning Science Into Collaborative Action

Guided by foundations in social sciences, the MCC program directly supports communities confronting the impacts of climate change and other complex “adaptive challenges” through knowledge co-production. By cultivating relationships and understanding the needs of the community, and then working together to develop useful products, we are helping communities to adapt and build resiliency.  

Dive deeper: MCC Approach  

The knowledge co-production process can be applied in any location and at any spatial, organizational, or stakeholder scale. Our program focuses on networks that are accountable to specific landscapes and seascapes on Hawaiʻi Island and that are accountable to the human communities that utilize the natural resources within these landscapes. As the scientific process, research output, and long-term professional networks increasingly root within the needs, values, identities, and practices of specific places, these pathways and networks increasingly expand the capacities of adaptation, resilience, and sustainability within local communities. 

Dive deeper: Manager Context

Our Process

MCC employs the following four steps as we engage with communities through the process of knowledge co-production:

In 2015, the Manager Climate Corps began searching out existing long-term local professional networks that would create the MCC’s foundation and guide its climate research efforts at UH Hilo (see Manager Needs Assessment). Understanding the needs of diverse local professional networks would guide our subsequent knowledge co-production and networking efforts and the types of products that result.

The MCC foundation was deliberately built on sustained, long-term, and in-person interaction with local managers. By focusing on iterative, growing relationships, rather than a momentary needs assessment, the MCC can maintain support for local professional networks through time by sustained understanding of individual managers’ perceptions, norms, values, needs, information sources, and experiences—collectively their worldviews.

While there is a national focus on conducting “stakeholder-driven” science, managers, decision makers, stakeholders, and end users are frequently poorly defined and management scales not clearly outlined. Therefore, we chose to connect with individuals whose positions are largely focused within Hawaiʻi Island and who are directly accountable to explicit areas of land, water, and the surrounding communities that utilize the managed natural resources.

The Manager Climate Corps network is comprised of local managers across a variety of organization levels (e.g., county, state and federal government, NGOs, and private land managers), as well as a diversity of management sectors that may be influenced by changing climate (e.g., county planning, agriculture, and infrastructure).

We continue to locate, engage, and build upon existing professional networks in order to the address the diverse array of emerging climate adaptation issues on Hawaiʻi Island. This program is inclusive of wide-ranging management perspectives in native ecosystems (terrestrial and marine), traditional cultural sites, traditional cultural homelands, marine recreation,  near-shore harvesting, transport and safety, ranching, agriculture, county planning, community-based management, fire hazards, and invasive species.

Dive deeper: Manager Needs Assessment

Read more: Environmental Management publication, Needs Assessment report (PDF)

The Manager Climate Corps program hosts co-knowledge co-production workshops led by natural and cultural resource managers in order to engage with all interested UH faculty and federal researchers. These workshops initiate an extended proposal request process that requires existing relationships between scientist and stakeholders to initiate a research pathway. Meetings hosted in 2016 and 2019 were well attended by diverse researcher representation, including sociology, Hawaiian studies, anthropology, geography, environmental engineering, environmental economics, marine sciences, and ecology.

The MCC program staff presents our knowledge co-production process and participant resource management groups from around the island and from ridge to reef present their organizations’ research needs in relation to climate change adaptation. The second half of the meetings are dedicated to round table discussions exploring possible collaborative research projects, workshops, and coursework development at the university. Three formal calls for manager-driven research project proposals were distributed university-wide and across manager networks as a result of these collaborative workshops.

The faculty-manager roundtable discussions can lead to funding of manager-driven graduate research projects covering a wide range of interests. For example, a 2016 project initiated from workshop discussions was published as a case study in the US Climate Resiliency Toolkit. Because managers are co-leading each research project from inception to completion, the research products have a higher likelihood of being readily put to use and shared with broader professional networks on Hawaiʻi Island and beyond.

Dive deeper: MCC FY2016 Research Projects

Read more: A case study in the US Climate Resiliency Toolkit

The Manager Climate Corps (MCC) program organizes interactive forums where the large and diverse collection of MCC members from the above research and management collaborations work with MCC staff to organize unique engagement experiences.

In 2016, this network held a three-night, four-day climate change immersion camp bringing together managers, scientists, traditional Hawaiian cultural practitioners, graduate students, and policy professionals. Attendees collaboratively discussed current and near-future needs for adapting to local climate change impacts around the themes of knowledge co-production, multiple ways of knowing, and place-based adaptive management. The camp took place outdoors amid endemic forest species at the Kiolakaʻa Ranger Station in Kaʻū and showcased our four manager-led graduate research projects as collaborative examples for other participating professional networks. Post event surveys indicated a strong interest in further developing diverse professional networks as a mechanism of building local capacities of resiliency, adaptation, and sustainability in the face of global change.

In the years following the immersion camp, the MCC has also developed a number of diverse interactive conference forums locally, regionally, and nationally. The forums are all focused on building adaptive capacity, knowledge co-production, and growing strong in-person networking opportunities between graduate students, scientists, and managers.Forums have utilized a variety of formats (film, panels, small group discussions, and presentations) and are opportunities to interactively participate in uniting multiple knowledge forms and distinct worldviews through professional networking opportunities. Groups in these events typically discussed the application of knowledge co-production on the ground.

By drawing diverse backgrounds, in-person forums such as these are unique opportunities for researchers, stakeholders, and the next generation of professionals to develop relationships, deepen understanding across worldviews, expand networks, develop actionable products, and, thereby, build upon human capacities of adaptation, resilience, and sustainability through times of significant socio-ecological change.

Dive Deeper: 2016 MCC Climate Change Immersion Camp

Check out our other forums: MCC Events

Manager Context

MANAGER TYPES

Examples of managers involved in MCC networks: ranchers, farmers, traditional native Hawaiian managers of biocultural resources, fire managers, coastal managers, infrastructure planning and development professionals, managers of native marine and remnant terrestrial ecosystems, and invasive species managers.

MANAGER SCALE

Spatial Scale

While knowledge co-production can be utilized at any geographic, organizational, or political scale, we focus on a specific spatial scale: Hawaiʻi Island (managers and policy professionals primarily focused on Hawaiʻi Island). Managers can be site-specific, focused on larger watershed/moku scales, or island-wide. The central requirement is direct and regular involvement within and, therefore, accountability to a specific, well-defined landscape or waterscape as well as accountability to the communities (group norms and values) that utilize the natural resources within the area.

Organizational Scale

MCC projects and events include a wide range of organizational scales, including non-governmental organizations as well as federal, state, county, and for profit organizations.

MANAGER ROLES

Custodians of Context

Cooperation and context from grassroots stakeholders are vital to achieve a common vision, which is paramount in determining the societal capacity for adaptation. Field managers and local decision makers function as custodians of context in the socio-ecological systems in which they are embedded. Informed by their regular experiences in the places they influence and are influenced by, field practitioners are immediately accountable to an explicit extent of land, water, and communities of people (Brown et al., 2012; Laursen et al., 2018).

Multiple Ways of Knowing

MCC projects emphasize and integrate multiple knowledge forms and distinct worldviews by supporting diverse networks of natural resource managers, cultural practitioners, policy professionals, social scientists, climate scientists, and biological scientists (Laursen et al., 2018; Ingold, 2011). The phrase “multiple ways of knowing” includes logical knowledge forms (articulate knowledge) that result from rational intellect, technical analysis, and reason, as well as intrinsic knowledge forms (tacit knowledge) that result from experience, instinct, perception, cultural practice, intuition, and emotion.

Cheyenne Perry, Mauna Kea Watershed Alliance, teaches a field crew a method of outplanting māmane, an endemic dry forest tree species, in the Mauna Kea Kanakaleonui Bird Corridor.
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Articulate Knowledge - codified knowledge (e.g., formal education, books, rule sets, and legal codes) that is readily transferable (Dampney et al., 2002; Brown et al., 2012)

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Tacit Knowledge - personal knowledge residing within the mind, behavior, and perceptions of individuals that is largely derived from experiences. Such visceral knowledge can be derived through intuition, emotion, sensory engagement, instinct, as well as cultural beliefs, norms, or values that become evident as a result of experience (Dampney et al., 2002; Brown et al., 2012).

Tacit knowledge is largely experiential and often place-based in that it is achieved through direct person-to-person and person-to-nature interactions. It can be difficult to characterize in explicit form (Dampnew et al., 2002; Brown et al., 2012). Though at times challenging to define or quantify, tacit knowledge forms are often stronger drivers of human behavior than articulate knowledge forms (Kahan et al., 2012; van der Linden et al., 2015; Amel et al., 2017). Similarly in relation to intrinsic knowledge, Ingold (2011) states that “information, in itself, is not knowledge, nor do we become any more knowledgeable through its accumulation. Our knowledgeability consists, rather, in the capacity to situate such information, and understand its meaning within the context of direct perceptual engagements with our environments.”

QUICK LINKS

CONTACTS

Dr. Jim Beets, University Consortium Lead
beets@hawaii.edu
(808) 932-7506

Scott Laursen, Climate Adaptation Extension Specialist
slaursen@hawaii.edu