CLIMATE SCIENCE

FOREST MANAGEMENT

Projected Species Range Maps over the Next Century

Projected Species Range Maps over the Next Century

Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is home to 23 species of endangered vascular plants and 15 species of endangered trees. Understanding how climate change may impact the park’s plants is vital for their long-term survival. This product was designed to assist managers of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park in preparing for a changing climate by identifying how plant distributions within the park may shift under future climate conditions, focusing on how these distributions compare with currently defined Special Ecological Areas within the park.
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A variety of lush trees form an intergrown area.

Agroforestry in the Climate of the Marshall Islands

Agriculture and agroforestry (tree cultivation) are important activities for the Marshall Islands and other small islands to ensure food security and human health, support community self-sufficiency, promote good nutrition, and serve as windbreaks to stabilize shorelines and lessen storm damage and erosion. However, climate change is posing serious challenges for growers who struggle to adapt to climate impacts including saltwater intrusion, changing precipitation and temperature patterns, and the spread of invasive species. This tool was designed to provide Marshallese agricultural producers with information and resources that will help them adapt their growing practices to changing climate conditions.
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Image looking up the trunk of a light-barked tree

Comparing arbuscular mycorrhizal diversity among different life stages of Intsia bijuga (Colebr.) Kuntze in Guam’s Limestone Forests

PI: Andrea Blas, Asst. Professor of Plant Pathology, University of Guam
Co-PI: Charles "CJ" Paulino, Environmental Science, University of Guam
Funded: FY2020
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People arranged in a circle with background of mountains of the Pali

Enhancing social-ecological resilience and ecosystem services through restoration of coastal agroforestry systems

PI: Leah Bremer, Assistant Specialist and Conservation Scientist, UH Mānoa
Co-PI: Gina McGuire, Department of Geography, UH Mānoa
Funded: FY2020
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Hilly barren landscape with low burnt browned grass

Biochar as a mitigation tool for soil rehabilitation in Guam’s badlands and savannah grasslands

PI: Mohammad Golabi, Professor of Soil Science, University of Guam
Co-PI: Patrick Keeler, Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, University of Guam
Funded: FY2020
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A small, brown bird sits on the branch of a tree

Development of an early warning system for climate-change related invasion by mosquitoes into Hakalau Forest NWR

PI: Patrick Hart, Professor of Biology, UH Hilo
Co-PI: Stephanie Mladinich, Tropical Conservation Biology & Environmental Science, UH Hilo
Funded: FY2020
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A dry grassy landscape of gently rolling hillocks and occasional trees.

Optimizing techniques to restore forest to increase endangered species habitat and mitigate future drought

PI: Jonathan Price, Professor of Geography , UH Hilo
Co-PI: Amberly Pigao, Tropical Conservation Biology & Environmental Science, UH Hilo
Funded: FY2020
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An inner slope of the cone shows grass and sparse trees

Understanding plants of the past to inform community reforestation efforts in the future

PI: Jonathan Price, Professor of Geography , UH Hilo
Co-PI: David Russell , Restoration & Outplanting Field Assistant, Nāpuʻu Natural Resources Management
Funded: FY2020
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A scrubby landscape in the foreground is backed by mist and a low, ground-hugging rainbow.

Identifying the risk of runoff and erosion in Hawaiʻi’s National Parks

PI: Lucas Fortini, Research Ecologist, USGS Pacific Islands Ecosystem Research Center
Co-PI: Victoria Keener, Research Fellow, PacRISA, East-West Center, UH Mānoa
Funded: FY2018
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Green bushes dot a brown, scrubby landscape looking toward distant coastal clouds.

Effectiveness of high-elevation habitat restoration for increasing resiliency of the palila honeycreeper

PI: Pat Hart, Professor of Biology, UH Hilo
Co-I: Kahua Julian, Department of Agriculture, UH Hilo & Technician, Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project
Funded: FY2018
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